How to Lead Amidst Poor Management

According to the State of the Workplace study conducted by Gallup, an estimated 85 percent of Americans feel disconnected in their careers. Disengagement results from many things, such as lack of advancement opportunities and work-life balance, and a missing sense of purpose. Poor leadership is often the root cause: many leaders fail to recognize employee achievements and set realistic expectations. While this can lead to low morale, remaining positive is key. Self-reflection and calling upon available resources can reignite your occupational ambitions. Here are some tips to get started:

TALK TO SOMEONE
Gain a third-party perspective
Odds are, someone you know has experienced what you’re feeling. Get insight on what they’ve done in the past to remain engaged.

SEEK MEANING
Rediscover what motivated you
Seek meaning by reflecting on your work situation. Identify why you’re disengaged and map out a strategy to overcome it, whether within the current company or not.

MAKE IT FUN
Seek out enjoyment at work
Your attitude can be a powerful source of inspiration. Find fun in what you do, whether it’s interacting with coworkers or flexing your problem-solving skills.

INVOLVE COWORKERS
Find out what inspires them
Want to create buy-in with team members? Determine what drives people to perform at their peak through daily interaction —and they’ll be more willing to contribute at work.

SEEK MORE WAYS TO LEAD
Know what you do well and be proactive
Take initiative and offer solutions within your skill set. New roles often formulate when staff members exemplify leadership traits and show real excitement in their role.

COMMUNICATE CLEARLY
Blurred communication confuses and frustrates
Clarity simplifies communication and helps everyone work together. Ensure your message is clear by encouraging your team members to ask questions.

ADOPT A LEADER MENTALITY
It’s more than just “thinking”
Don’t be afraid to collaborate with coworkers. Initiate conversations and schedule meetings. Ask for feedback and organize a plan of attack.

Leadership comes in all shapes and sizes. Strong leaders introduce new strategies and energize staff to feel more connected with their work, increasing productivity and job satisfaction. While roughly a third of Americans aim for leadership positions, according to CareerBuilder, it’s safe to say that most want to affect change and make a difference. By adopting some of these behaviors, you can prove to your bosses that you’re not someone they can afford to lose.

    Posted in: News  

Comments(0)

Leave a Comment